Category: Autonomy and Motivation

“Metacognition” – a current buzz word in education circles, yes, but unlike some it’s a buzz word with solid empirical backing. It really is worth thinking about. Metacognition’s definition is short and sweet: Meta- refers to “above” and Cognition- refers to “thinking, reasoning, and problem solving.” So the short definition really is something akin to […]

A consideration of empirically based ideals for creating vibrant, healthy schools As we settle in to the new year, I can’t help but reflect on what’s just passed. Don’t we all do that? Consider the good and the bad, the fruitful and not so fruitful aspects of the year? The tail-end of 2014 twirled by […]

What’s old, made new again, could …be just the ticket out of this mess… Given an opportunity to observe a young child over an extended period of time, you are sure to see an interesting (and from a parent or teacher’s perspective often frustrating) pattern of growth. It goes something like this: A great leap […]

Learning styles are on my mind again as a second installment of my 2-week intensive “Psychology of Studying” class winds down. Like last year, I’m delighted with the class’s success: students are learning about learning while learning (ah, what fun!). Objectively, their scores on the measures of metacognition and self-determined motivation significantly increased (even when […]

The spring 2013 semester ended on quite the high note for me, when the University President honored me with the President’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. When you work at a place like I do where all your colleagues not only love to teach but are also quite good at it, this kind of […]

Once upon a time, but not that long ago, there lived an associate professor. This professor enjoyed her work and the students she worked with. She regularly put in long hours in the office diligently planning lectures and activities, mindful of the need for well-placed jokes, illustrations, examples, and time for processing. With as much […]